Movies From 1960s Were Most Creative In Cinema History, Study Finds

Many of the most-pirated movies aren’t available for legitimate online purchase

UPDATED11:19 AM EDT Oct 16, 2013 Photos Troy Newell/SXC Vampires and other movie monsters have always been a popular theme for screenwriters, but recently the vampire and werewolf craze has been reborn. More That rebirth is due in large part to the smashing success of the “Twilight” novels by Stephanie Meyer and the subsequent films. However, long before Robert Pattinson proved how truly sexy the undead could be, many other actors portrayed this favorite blood-sucking monster for the big screen. These days, movies and television series featuring hot, bloodthirsty vamps, such as HBO’s “True Blood” or The CW’s “The Vampire Diaries,” are becoming the norm. With so many worthy vampire movies to choose from, it was hard to narrow down the list, but we’ve managed to select the five best vampire movies ever. Read on at your own risk, because this list may contain spoilers. First up, sexy vamps and werewolves, oh my … No. 5: “Twilight” (2008) OK, so we’ll admit that a huge factor in our love of the vampire movie “Twilight” has to do with the casting of the breathtakingly gorgeous Robert Pattinson in the male lead, as the self-loathing vampire Edward Cullen. Of course, while we can’t get enough of Robert and his on- and off-screen love interest Kristen Stewart, there is also something to be said for the “Twilight” plotline, which is dripping with suspense and romance. Unlike most other vampire movies, there’s not a lot of blood and gore, but there’s still plenty of action. The two sequels so far, “New Moon” (2009) and “Eclipse” (2010), provided more of the same and kept the female fan base happy with plenty of shirtless moments from Rob and co-star Taylor Lautner.

Kristen Stewart and Robert Patinson in Twilight

Physicist Sameet Sreenivasan of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in New York conducted a detailed data analysis of novel and unique elements in movies throughout the 20th century. Sreenivasan analyzed keywords used on the Internet Movie Database (IMDb) to observe trends. A novelty score was given based on the number of times any given keyword was used to describe another film. Films that had higher novelty scores featured a word that was rarely used to describe it. While films with lower novelty scores had a keyword used to describe a variety of them. A range from zero to one was applied as the novelty score, with the least novel being zero. To depict the evolution of film culture over time, Sreenivasan then lined up the scores chronologically. “You always hear about how the period from 1929 to 1950 was known as the Golden Age of Hollywood,” Sreenivasan said to Wired. “There were big movies with big movie stars. But if you look at novelty at that time, you see a downward trend.” After studio systems fell in the 1950s, filmmakers burst with new ideas which enhanced the movies during the 1960s. Films like Bonnie and Clyde in 1967, Breathless in 1960, and The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly in 1966 were all very well received. In addition, plot lines, novel styles and film techniques helped create the increase in Sreenivasan’s analysis of that period. The films analyzed spanned a 70-year period and the study appears in Nature Scientific Reports . 2013 CBS Interactive Inc.

After a documentary and several shorts, Godard made his first feature, "Breathless (A Bout de Souffle)" (1960), a brisk dark comedy starring Jean-Paul Belmondo as a petty thief and Jean Seberg as an American ex-pat.

From October 26th, customers can subscribe to 11 Sky Movies channels in SD as well as on-demand content for an additional fee. It’ll all be done via existing Vision+ and YouView hardware, so there’s no need to buy any more gear, although HD-enthusiasts might just have to bite the bullet and sign up with Rupert directly. Show full PR text BT and Sky reach agreement to add Sky Movies to BT TV BT and Sky have signed a multi-year contract which will see Sky Movies made available through BT TV. BT will offer Sky Movies for a monthly subscription that customers can add to their existing BT TV package from October 26. The agreement means that BT will be able to offer its TV customers the option to bolt-on Sky Movies whether they are customers with the YouView box or the latest Vision + box. For Sky, the deal supports Sky’s growing wholesale content business. BT TV customers will be able to enjoy the latest movies across 11 Sky Movies channels, in standard definition, both as streamed live channels and on-demand for those with BT Infinity fibre broadband. For customers with regular BT broadband Sky Movies is only available on-demand. Sky Movies is the UK’s most popular subscription movies service giving access to over 700 different movies on demand including brand new exclusive premieres every week from major Hollywood studios such as Disney, Fox, Paramount, Sony, Warner Bros., and Universal. Sky Movies subscribers can choose from more of the latest and biggest movies first, at least 12 months before any online subscription service. Premieres in October include Argo, Django Unchained, Les Miserables and Gangster-Squad. Zero Dark Thirty and Life Of Pi will premiere in November.

Sky Movies comes to BT TV, hell braces itself for cold snap

Sky Movies comes to BT TV, hell braces itself for cold snap

“Today there are more ways than ever to watch movies and TV shows legally online, and more are constantly being added,” she said in an e-mailed statement. “If a particular film isn’t available for stream or purchase at a given moment, however, it does not justify stealing it from the creators and makers who worked hard to make it.” Brito insists he’s not trying to excuse piracy. But, he argues, “I don’t understand how the industry is making a big show about Google not taking voluntary measures to help with piracy.” Hollywood, he says, could “change its business model to take their own voluntary measures to deal with piracy,” by making movies more readily available through legal online channels. If it chooses not to do that, he believes, they have no business complaining that tech companies aren’t doing enough to combat the problem. But Bedingfield counters that films get heavily pirated even when they’re made available in online formats. The Walking Dead was pirated 500,000 times within 16 hours despite the fact that it is available to stream for free for the next 27 days on AMCs website and distributed in 125 countries around the world the day after it aired,” she says. “Our industry is working hard to bring content to audiences when they want it, where they want it, but content theft is a complex problem that requires comprehensive, voluntary solutions from all stakeholders involved.” Finally, Bedingfield points out that the Mercatus Center counts Google among its funders. Correction: The original data supplied to us by PiracyData.org was inaccurate. It showed 1 movie available for rental and 4 available for purchase. In fact, at least 3 were available for rental and 6 were available for purchase. “Pacific Rim” is also now available for digital rental, though it’s not clear if that was true on Monday. We regret the errors. We also added some additional comments from the MPAA’s Kate Bedingfield to the end of the article. Timothy B. Lee covers technology policy, including copyright and patent law, telecom regulation, privacy, and free speech.