France Expels Girl To Kosovo After Class Trip

France Covers Obama’s Middle East Retreat

Sent! A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. 10 To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs France expels girl to Kosovo after class trip AP 5:59 p.m. EDT October 16, 2013 From left 15 year old Leonarda Dibrani, joined by her brothers Ronaldo 9, Roki 11, Masar 5, expelled from France last week, during an interview for The Associated Press in a room of a shelter house in Mitrovica, northern Kosovo, on Wednesday. (Photo: Visar Kryeziu, AP) France’s president Hollande has tried to appear more immigrant-friendly Girl’s family had fled persecution in Kosovo Father has not yet told kids reason for expulsion SHARE 31 CONNECT 24 TWEET 10 COMMENTEMAILMORE MITROVICA, Kosovo (AP) Leonarda Dibrani was finishing up a field trip when French police showed up at the bus, detaining the 15-year-old schoolgirl in front of her classmates before authorities expelled her to Kosovo because her family’s asylum application had been rejected. The incident earlier this month, but which was made public this week, has sparked outrage from immigrant groups and others who say police went too far in publicly shaming the teenager. It has also been an embarrassment for President Francois Hollande’s government, which has tried to portray a kinder France in a bid to distance itself from conservative predecessor Nicolas Sarkozy, known for his tough immigration policies. An investigation into the treatment of the girl, which also drew criticism from within the ranks of Hollande’s Socialist Party, has been launched. Now, Dibrani says she just wants to get back to France. “I was crying on my teacher’s lap and he was crying,” Dibrani said Wednesday, recounting her ordeal in an interview with The Associated Press. “My friends asked: ‘Did you kill someone that the police are looking for you?’ I was afraid. I felt bad and ashamed. “My home is in France,” Dibrani said in French, dressed in jeans and a colorful paisley print tunic.

France’s Retirement Reform: Too Little, Too Late?

“It’s the salami strategy,” said Elie Cohen, an economist at Sciences Po university. “We have a big problem, we don’t know how to fix it, so we cut it into pieces, like a nice sausage.” Hollande’s reform would lengthen the number of years people must work to receive a full pension, from 41 years today to 43 years by 2035; the first increases begin in 2020. Economists say there are three problems with the proposal: It takes effect after most baby boomers will have retired, meaning it doesn’t address the cost of paying for their pensions; it still isn’t asking people to work long enough, especially since life expectancy is rising; and it ignores the special deals that allow some workers to retire early and account for two-thirds of the retirement system’s 20 billion-euro ($27 billion) deficit. The European Commission, the EU’s executive arm, and others have raised concerns about how the pensions system will be paid for without further burdening French employers, which already pay the highest payroll taxes in the EU. The problem with the “salami strategy” is that the reforms are always behind the curve. Jacob Kirkegaard, an economist at the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington, says the reform might have worked if it had been done 20 years ago. Now France needs much more. Among the world’s most developed countries, only Luxembourg has a lower effective retirement age, according to the OECD, an economic policy group. The issue of pensions is so sensitive that no one political party wants to make the painful changes that are needed. In other European countries with unsustainable retirement systems, such as Spain and Italy, the financial crisis has threatened to bankrupt the government, pushing politicians to act. France has been spared such turmoil and lacked the same incentives. “There is only one party in France and that is the status quo party,” said Kirkegaard.

France to take in 500 Syrian refugees

A Syrian refugees protest at the ferry terminal in Calais, northern France on October 4, 2013

Associated Press ALLEN PARK, Mich. (AP) Ndamukong Suh has been fined by the NFL. Associated Press PAKSE, Laos (AP) Rescuers in fishing boats pulled bodies from the muddy Mekong River on Thursday as officials in Laos ruled out finding survivors from a plane that crashed in stormy weather, killing 49 people from 11 countries. Associated Press Veteran character actor Ed Lauter dies at 74 after career that stretched across 5 decades ABC News LOS ANGELES (AP) Zack Greinke came out shaky against the St. Louis Cardinals, getting in early trouble with the Dodgers’ season hanging in the balance. Associated Press France expels girl to Kosovo after class trip MITROVICA, Kosovo (AP) Leonarda Dibrani was finishing up a field trip when French police showed up at the bus, detaining the 15-year-old schoolgirl in front of her classmates before authorities expelled her to Kosovo because her family’s asylum application had been rejected. Associated Press U.S. Congress ends default threat, Obama vows to sign bill By Richard Cowan and David Lawder WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Congress on Wednesday approved an 11th-hour deal to end a partial government shutdown and pull the world’s biggest economy back from the brink of a historic debt default that could have threatened financial calamity. Capping weeks of Reuters Security a concern for weapons inspectors in Syria THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) Car bombs and mortars have exploded close to the hotel where chemical weapons inspectors are staying in the Syrian capital in recent days, but officials said Thursday there is no way of knowing if the team is being deliberately targeted. Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea (AP) The G2 and the G Pad 8.3, the flagship smartphone and tablet from LG Electronics Inc., are great mobile devices that have fantastic screens, top-end cameras and ample processing power. Associated Press Cory Booker won his bid for New Jerseys U.S.

france expels girl kosovo class trip

Obama’s reversal, which left French President Francois Hollande “flabbergasted,” according to Le Monde. Writing for the World Today magazine, Mr. Grand describes a France that is troubled about the dwindling prospect of Western countries “enforcing” peace and security. “This more interventionist and Atlanticist France,” he says, “sees U.S. leadership often lacking resolve, hesitant, tempted by strategic retrenchment.” It’s a view that jibes with France’s experience with Mr. Obama’s erratic policy. Last October, the White House contacted both France and Britain to say that America would move to an interventionist position on Syria akin to theirs after the November U.S. election. Pfft. Both French and British officials told me that after being kept in the dark for two months, they learned in January this year that the White House plan was dead. A French official also said that in a discussion on Mali in October 2012, former U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta promised, referring to an eventual French incursion, “Whatever you need, ask me. You’ll get it.” As it turned out, the White House overruled Mr.

France in demand again as Central Africa crisis deepens

“Let’s make up with the mother that feeds us! President Hollande we want your help!” read one banner as cheering locals welcomed France’s foreign minister, Laurent Fabius, to Central African Republic at the weekend. Plunged into chaos since mostly Muslim Seleka rebels ousted President Francois Bozize in the mostly Christian country in March, the nation is facing sectarian violence, malnutrition and a near total collapse of state rule. Fearing their plight has been eclipsed internationally by conflicts in Syria and Mali, some see France as their best hope. “We’ve seen coups before, but nothing like this,” said local Bangui journalist Steve Niko. “In Mali the population suffered in one area, but here we’re suffering everywhere. It’s like our crisis has been forgotten.” The landlocked nation is rich with minerals ranging from uranium to diamonds. But decades of instability and official corruption have meant those potential riches have been little exploited and have far less been of help to the population. As violence including murder and rape drives more than 440,000 people from their homes, there are just seven surgeons in a country of 4.6 million people to deal with bullet and machete injuries and one in 10 children die at birth. “The Seleka rebels came with weapons, hurt us, burnt our houses and then there were reprisals from Christian militias,” said a woman called Dore at one hospital in Bangui, recounting how she fled hundreds of kilometers on foot with three children all under the age of six. Long seen by many in Central African Republic as meddling in its affairs after independence in 1960, France has intervened in the past, for example when it supported Bozize in 2006 against an earlier incarnation of northern rebels. But official French policy now is for a more “hands-off” stance in such conflicts. Paris is all the more reluctant to be left to deal with another African hotspot after it felt allies such as the United States were hesitant to help it in Mali.

France, Portugal among eight nations set for UEFA World Cup qualifying playoffs

France beat Finland 3-0 in its last Group game, but Spain’s win over Georgia ensured Les Bleus were consigned to second, while Cristiano Ronaldo and his Portugal teammates finished a point behind Fabio Capello’s Russia in Group F. The one UEFA group runner-up that will miss out on a playoff spot due to its worst record against the first-, third-, fourth- and fifth-placed sides is Denmark due to there only being eight spots up for grabs. Group B’s race for second between four teams – Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Armenia and the Danes – went down to the wire, and the way the countries took points off each other worked against them in the end. Sweden was the only team heading into the final round of matches to be guaranteed to be in the playoffs, with Germany a distant Group C winner, no teams challenging for second place and the bottom-placed team already decided. The second team to know its playoff fate was Greece, as Bosnia and Herzegovina won to deny the Euro 2004 winner automatic entry to the World Cup. Croatia already bagged second place in Group A and was able to avoid missing out on the playoffs despite losing 2-0 to Scotland in its final game on Tuesday. Iceland, which has never reached a major international tournament in its footballing history, will be delighted to have a crack at World Cup 2014 qualification after Slovenia was defeated 1-0 by Group E winners Switzerland, meaning the Scandinavians’ 1-1 draw with Norway was enough to finish second. Turkey’s 2-0 defeat to Netherlands ensured that Romania finished ahead of its Group D runner-up challengers, and Fatih Terim’s men slipped from second to fourth, with Hungary hopping into third with its 2-0 win over Andorra. The final spot on Tuesday went to Ukraine, which hammered San Marino 8-0 but was pipped to first place in Group H by England. The draw for the two-legged ties will take place Oct. 21 in Zurich.